Privacy Act Rights

Innovations Marketing Group / inflatablepartymask.com follows the privacy requirements of the Privacy Act, which protects your personal information that we maintain in what is called a system of records. A system of records is a file, database, or program from which personal information is retrieved by name or other personal identifier. In other words, the Privacy Act applies when we use your personal information to know who you are and to interact with you – such as when you provide information to request a product or service, register on usps.com, or submit an inquiry or complaint. The Privacy Act provides comprehensive protections for your personal information. This includes how information is collected, used, disclosed, stored, and discarded.

When we collect and maintain personal information from you offline, a Privacy Act notice will be provided. The following is your Privacy Act notice for personal information collected online:

Privacy Act notice: Your information will be used to provide you requested products, services, or information. Collection is authorized by 39 USC 401, 403, & 404. Providing the information is voluntary, but if not provided, we may not process your transaction. We do not disclose your information to third parties without your consent, except to facilitate the transaction, to act on your behalf or request, or as legally required. This includes the following limited circumstances: to a congressional office on your behalf; to financial entities regarding financial transaction issues; to a USPS auditor; to entities, including law enforcement, as required by law or in legal proceedings; to domestic and international customs relating to outgoing international mail pursuant to federal law and agreements; and to contractors and other entities aiding us to fulfill the service (service providers).

United States
In the United States, according to the [[United States Patent and Trademark Office]], the expression "Patent" as such does protect an invention:

The marking of an article as patented when it is not in fact patented is against the law and subjects the offender to a penalty. Some persons mark articles sold with the terms "Patent Applied For" or "Patent Pending." These phrases have no legal effect, but only give information that an application for patent has been filed in the Patent and Trademark Office. The protection afforded by a patent does not start until the actual grant of the patent. False use of these phrases or their equivalent is prohibited." [[United States Patent and Trademark Office]] web site, [http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/doc/general/patpend.htm - PATENT MARKING AND "PATENT PENDING"] (Excerpted from General Information Concerning Patents print brochure)

The use of the term "patent pending" or "patent applied for" is permitted so long as a patent application has actually been filed. If these terms are used when no patent application has been filed it is deemed as a deceptive act and a fine of up to $500 may be imposed for every such offense. [http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/documents/appxl_35_U_S_C_292.htm 35 U.S.C. 292] False Marking. Under the current interpretation of “offense,” each mis-marked article constitutes an offense, which permits theoretical damages in the hundreds of millions of dollars for high-volume consumer goods.[http://www.mayerbrown.com/publications/article.asp?id=8634&nid=6 “Watch Out for Patent Marking Trolls”]

Australia
In Australia, according to [[IP Australia]], the "patent" patent application has been filed for which a patent has necessarily been granted. "IP Australia"IP Australia website, [http://www.ipaustralia.gov.au/media/pages/whatis/patents.htm] The marking of an article has a legal effect under Section 123 of the Patents Act 1990 with the result that a defendant is taken to be aware of the existence of patent rights. Patents Act 1990 (Australia, Cth) §123

In Australia, the preferred marking is "Aust. Pat. App. No. is allocated by the Australian Patent Office.

There are penalties for making a false indication of the existence of patent rights for any invention. Patents Act 1990 (Australia, Cth) §178

The information contained in this web site is subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 1994-2010 Innovations Marketing Group, / InflatablePartyMask.com All rights reserved.
Innovations Marketing Group, / InflatablePartyMask.com, 4915 NW 159th St, Miami, FL 33014, USA.

Updated by The Innovations Marketing Group / InflatablePartyMask.com Legal Team on Jan. 20, 2010

Imagine the possibilities

We will make it "POP-UP"

Make it happen

Your companies image

360° View